Showing posts with label embroidery. Show all posts
Showing posts with label embroidery. Show all posts

Saturday, May 18, 2013

So the journey continues to our final destination, Karnataka.

Along with work, we had time for a little bit of playing. Check out Hampi! It is spectacular! An ancient empire ruin, still untouched, spread across acres of land. The bright blue sky truly made the view amanzing. I hope you enjoy and one day get a chance to go visit it yourself. Highly recommended.

Wednesday, September 26, 2012

The imprint of the woman

Our inspiration wall is filled with the many embroideries of Kutch, a region in Gujarat, India. Many sub communities who are known for their embroidery hereditary are spread around the kutch region. We had the pleasure of visiting a few of them and buying straight from the women in the villages. Each piece is a living imprint of the woman and her craft history.

Many organizations work one on one in cooperatives with these women to help them zone in on their skill as well as elaborate their business skills. You can soon find unique Ichcha products that work to encourage this traditional craft.

Thursday, April 7, 2011

Day 2 of Kachchh, Gujarat

We're off to see BLOCK PRINTING!!
 We visit the famous Ajrak block printers in the towns of Dhamadkao and Ajrakpur. I finally get to see the ever famous Dr. Ismail Khatri. I took some pictures paparazzi style. 
 So, the Ajrak block printing is a 18 color process, taking 2 weeks to a month to finish one design. Their designs are highly recognizable because of the geometric patterns that are famous in their community. We met Aurangzeb and Sufiyan Bhai, the next and 8th generation of block printers in their family.

Many of the steps and materials used differed from the process administered in Pipar City. The designs also were more fine and complex as compared to the ones in Pipar. That is due to the printing technique. Pipar does a lot of dabu, or mud resist, printing which requires the design to be more bold. The designs in Ajrak printing are not done using mud. They instead use a mixture of gum arabic and lime to create the resist, which I guess allows finely carved blocks to be used. 

Next we stopped at a village called Dhaanati Village. It is a community where the women engage in embroidery work for an organization called Shrujan. About 50-70 women in this village work with Shrujan, out of the 112 villages that they work with. We went into the house of Laxmi ben who showed us her embroideries, some of them done 30 years ago for her dowry. Also, in the back of her house, there were a few women who were doing embroidery together, these are women that Laxmi ben has employed herself.